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La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 7:13

New York Post

Drama Mama:Miniseries back to 'Earth'
“The Pillars of the Earth” (Friday, 10 p.m., Starz) Mama can fondly recall plenty of summer nights back in the ’80s that she spent watching some of the great TV miniseries. There was something about ending a day at the beach in the cool air-conditioned comfort with a TV show that you knew was just a summer romance. Starz has revived the old-school miniseries with its tumultuous “The Pillars of Earth,” which lasts just six weeks, kicking off with a two-hour premiere. Besides starring Mama’s favorite gravelly voiced bad ass, Ian McShane, “Pillars” reaches way back with the history of King Henry—the first one—to bring us an heir-to-the-throne story that Mama can’t already recite. It’s big, it’s over the top and it’s the perfect summer treat.

Merci à Darcilicious.



Dernière édition par Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 7:19, édité 1 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 7:15

stltoday.com
In 12th century England, the poor are so poor that a pig is worth a life. Medicine is rejected as sin — or witchcraft. Churchmen poison one another wantonly, and beheadings are preceded by puppet shows.

But Tom Builder is a better man than most of those around him. He wants to turn stone into beautiful, soaring spaces, not castles for princes but cathedrals that reach halfway to God.

Rufus Sewell stars as Tom in "The Pillars of the Earth," a richly textured dramatization of Ken Follett's 1989 historical novel, a worldwide best seller and one-time "Oprah" book. The miniseries, a German-Canadian production airing in the United States on Starz, will unfold over eight hours and seven weeks in the Friday time slot where Starz had a hit with "Spartacus: Blood and Sand."

I found "Spartacus" ridiculous, although I can certainly understand watching it for the blood and sex.

"The Pillars of the Earth," though, is far more than "Blood and Mud," despite offering plenty of sword fights, impalings and executions for action fans.

The drama in "Pillars" is driven by its characters, especially Tom, and Sewell (most recently seen on American TV in "Eleventh Hour") is just the actor to make us bond immediately with our hero. This is true despite the fact that we've hardly met him when we watch him abandon his newborn son on a grave.

Times are tough for Tom. He was building a castle when the project fell rather violently through, leaving him and his family destitute. But the tragic turn of events introduces Tom to Ellen (Natalia Wörner), a self-described renegade nun who turns out to be quite a comfort, and her mysterious, almost mute son Jack (Eddie Redmayne), an artist in stone.

Meanwhile, back in Winchester, the war of succession known as the Anarchy is raging. King Stephen (Tony Curran) has succeeded his uncle, Henry I, after a suspicious shipwreck took out the king's only legitimate male heir. Earl Bartholomew (Donald Sutherland) is loyal to Henry's daughter Maud (Allison Pill), while Waleran (the great Ian McShane) is loyal only to himself.

The core of "Pillars" follows Tom as he builds a cathedral in fictional Kingsbridge for Prior Philip (Matthew Macfadyen), who is determined to "give God a beautiful home."

"This cathedral is more than just stone and wood and mud," the prior exhorts the exhausted workers. "It takes the earth with all its heaviness and transforms it into possibility, reaching for the light, which is hope, which is God."

Executive producers Tony and Ridley Scott and director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan have honored Follett's novel by giving its themes of art and beauty almost equal weight to its political intrigues and religious infighting. Fans of the 1989 novel, which has sold more than 14 million copies and runs almost 1,000 pages, may regret that the story had to be compressed for television, while medievalists might protest, as they did with the book, that historical accuracy is lacking.

But it's hard to complain about the $40 million production, shot in Austria and Hungary, and Follett has praised the producers attention to detail.

"The Pillars of the Earth" is the kind of splashy miniseries event that the broadcast networks can't or won't do anymore. Costs are so high and viewers' attention spans are so short that the extended miniseries these days belongs almost entirely to cable, especially premium cable.

Luckily, if you don't get Starz, you'll eventually be able to rent or buy "The Pillars of the Earth" on DVD. Meanwhile, you might do what I'm going to do: Read the book.

merci à Darcilicious.


Dernière édition par Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 7:18, édité 1 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 7:18

TV Junkie
"Pillars of the Earth" from Starz which premieres on July 23rd (surprisingly good!);
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 7:20

Ask Matt
Question: Thanks for your thoughtful analysis of Lost over the years, especially since the finale, and for your recent update on sci-fi shows in development. Fringe has taken over my #1 spot now since Lost is gone but I always look forward to the premiere of a new sci-fi series. I've been a huge Matthew Macfadyen fan since his MI-5 days so I'm always interested in what he's doing next. I saw that he had completed The Pillars of the Earth and was excited to see that Starz will be running it as an 8-hour miniseries in late July. Have you heard any buzz about it? — Darlene

Matt Roush: More than buzz, I've actually watched it. Pillars, based on Ken Follett's mammoth best-seller, is a return to the old-fashioned style of historical epic miniseries, a type of TV I grew up on and miss quite a bit. It's awfully hokey at times, but has an irresistibly unpretentious appeal. Matthew Macfadyen plays one of the more pious heroes, a monk who becomes prior and oversees construction of a cathedral that becomes the focal point for the many royal and religious and political intrigues. His co-stars are impressive, both veterans (Ian McShane, Donald Sutherland, Rufus Sewell) and upstarts (Eddie Redmayne, a recent Tony winner for Red, and Alison Pill). Compared to last season's Spartacus, this is rather tame stuff, and a curiously retro choice for a pay service like Starz, but I think and hope it will be successful.

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 7:23

De Chicago Sun Times
Oprah Winfrey told me to read The Pillars of the Earth, so I avoided it like the bubonic plague. I’m ornery that way. But after putting my life on pause to watch the eight-hour miniseries based on the book, I must grudgingly admit that she was onto something.

Curse you and your all-powerful wisdom, Oprah!

Ken Follett’s 1989 historical novel had a resurgence in popularity as a 2007 Book Club selection, and should finally achieve world domination with this adaptation. Who knew the Middle Ages were so soap-operatically . . . dark?

You can’t quibble with the casting: “Deadwood’s” Ian McShane is Bishop Waleran, a complicated, calculating politician with the oily voice of a Disney villain. Then there’s Eddie Redmayne, who plays the sensitive artistic genius Jack Jackson. Not only does Redmayne have a Middle Ages-worthy name — the redhead used to be a Burberry model — but he also just earned a Tony Award for best featured actor as Mark Rothko’s assistant in “Red.”

The scrumptious Rufus Sewell takes on the beloved role of visionary Tom Builder, who is determined to construct a cathedral using (gasp!) pointed arches. “A cathedral, it’s God’s anteroom,” he says in explaining his passion. “It’s halfway to heaven.” It was an era when you were likely to die of typhoid, leprosy or the odd crusade, so building a cathedral was pretty much your only bid for immortality.

Donald Sutherland gets a sword fight as the accused traitor Bartholomew, and his haughty daughter Aliena (Hayley Atwell) spends her life trying to regain what he lost. There are no slacking actors here, and good thing, too: The action never stops. As King Stephen and his cousin, Queen Maud, wage war over the throne, two families grapple over an earldom while dodging hangings, burnings, charges of witchcraft and daring assassinations.

The cathedral inches skyward, as infinite forces try to tear it down: armies, politics, gravity. Decade after decade, the men labor on as the suspense builds. Will someone invent the flying buttress already?

Book loyalists may be alarmed at some of the liberties the movie takes with the plot. VAGUE SPOILER ALERT: The new ending is over-the-top and suspiciously tidy. And in both the book and the movie, the bad guys are often signaled by obvious physical defects or affectations. Memo to Alfred, son of Tom Builder: Your evildoing would be more effective if you stopped glowering all the time.

Interestingly, Lady Regan is disfigured by boils in the book — but as played by Sarah Parish in the miniseries, she’s a handsome woman with an intriguing facial birthmark. Either way, I’d like to think we’d figure out her treachery without the visual cues.

Watch for Matthew Macfadyen in the tricky role of Prior Philip. Rolling his R’s and rocking a monk’s bald spot, the former Mr. Darcy (opposite Keira Knightley) manages to balance idealism, intelligence, faith and savvy. “The Pillars of the Earth” doesn’t shy away from any of the big questions, and Macfadyen has the depth to ask the biggest of them all: Just whose side is God on, anyway?

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 19:49

from Variety:
Having already made quite the bl**dy splash with "Spartacus" (a head-scratcher, that), Starz's acquisition of "The Pillars of the Earth" -- an eight-hour adaptation of Ken Follett's massive novel -- is another shrewd programming move, overflowing with prestigious British talent and a lusty story tailored to the pay-TV palate. Dealing with the building of a cathedral against a backdrop of royal succession in 12th-century England, "Pillars" doles out bl**dy battles, melodrama, illicit sex, rape, incest and revenge -- in short, everything people expect from their premium channels, all in one six-installment package.

Such projects are often only as good as their villains, and "Pillars" boasts two fabulous ones: Ian McShane as Bishop Waleran, the scheming clergyman who will stop at nothing in pursuit of power; and the amoral Regan Hamleigh ("Viva Blackpool's" Sarah Parish), the architect of her own plots -- sometimes in concert with Waleran -- to consolidate her family's power and secure land and titles for her brutal thug of a son (David Oakes).

On the nobler side of the ledger is Tom Builder (Rufus Sewell), who contracts to build a grand new cathedral with the Prior of Kingsbridge, Philip (Matthew Mac-fadyen), a pious sort at odds with both Waleran and the Hamleighs. The decades-long process of erecting the edifice plays out against an ongoing dispute over who will sit on England's throne, as King Stephen (Tony Curran) capitalizes on a power vacuum to seize power, triggering a civil war with the former king's daughter, Maud (Alison Pill).

Adapted by John Pielmeier and directed by Sergio Mimica-Gezzan, "Pillars'?" two-hour premiere proves a bit of a mess at first, trying to introduce a staggering assortment of characters, from Tom's extended brood to the Earl of Shiring (Donald Sutherland, in what amounts to a cameo) and his kids, Aliena (Hayley Atwell) and Richard (Sam Claflin), who will spend a generation's time seeking to reclaim their birthright.

Yet as the story moves along in one-hour chapters toward the super-sized finale, the roots begin sinking in, with the bad guys' various misdeeds mounting to the point where anticipation grows for someone to open a can of medieval whupass. And while the climax isn't entirely satisfying, "Pillars" does create strong roles for its female characters, Natalia Woerner's earthy Ellen and Atwell's determined ingenue balancing Parish's delicious wickedness.

Frankly, the whole exercise would be worth the price of admission (or rather, subscription) simply for the cobra-eyed McShane, whose Waleran makes Cardinal Richelieu look like a relative wimp. It's also an endorsement of the miniseries or limited-series approach, allowing the producers of this international co-venture (among them Ridley and Tony Scott's shingle) to invest the story with appropriate literary heft.

Starz has other similar projects in the pipeline, including a 10-part version of "Camelot." In that sense, the channel has chosen its maiden venture wisely, inasmuch as "Pillars" lays a solid foundation for what's to come.Having already made quite the bl**dy splash with "Spartacus" (a head-scratcher, that), Starz's acquisition of "The Pillars of the Earth" -- an eight-hour adaptation of Ken Follett's massive novel -- is another shrewd programming move, overflowing with prestigious British talent and a lusty story tailored to the pay-TV palate. Dealing with the building of a cathedral against a backdrop of royal succession in 12th-century England, "Pillars" doles out bl**dy battles, melodrama, illicit sex, rape, incest and revenge -- in short, everything people expect from their premium channels, all in one six-installment package.

Such projects are often only as good as their villains, and "Pillars" boasts two fabulous ones: Ian McShane as Bishop Waleran, the scheming clergyman who will stop at nothing in pursuit of power; and the amoral Regan Hamleigh ("Viva Blackpool's" Sarah Parish), the architect of her own plots -- sometimes in concert with Waleran -- to consolidate her family's power and secure land and titles for her brutal thug of a son (David Oakes).

On the nobler side of the ledger is Tom Builder (Rufus Sewell), who contracts to build a grand new cathedral with the Prior of Kingsbridge, Philip (Matthew Mac-fadyen), a pious sort at odds with both Waleran and the Hamleighs. The decades-long process of erecting the edifice plays out against an ongoing dispute over who will sit on England's throne, as King Stephen (Tony Curran) capitalizes on a power vacuum to seize power, triggering a civil war with the former king's daughter, Maud (Alison Pill).

Adapted by John Pielmeier and directed by Sergio Mimica-Gezzan, "Pillars'?" two-hour premiere proves a bit of a mess at first, trying to introduce a staggering assortment of characters, from Tom's extended brood to the Earl of Shiring (Donald Sutherland, in what amounts to a cameo) and his kids, Aliena (Hayley Atwell) and Richard (Sam Claflin), who will spend a generation's time seeking to reclaim their birthright.

Yet as the story moves along in one-hour chapters toward the super-sized finale, the roots begin sinking in, with the bad guys' various misdeeds mounting to the point where anticipation grows for someone to open a can of medieval whupass. And while the climax isn't entirely satisfying, "Pillars" does create strong roles for its female characters, Natalia Woerner's earthy Ellen and Atwell's determined ingenue balancing Parish's delicious wickedness.

Frankly, the whole exercise would be worth the price of admission (or rather, subscription) simply for the cobra-eyed McShane, whose Waleran makes Cardinal Richelieu look like a relative wimp. It's also an endorsement of the miniseries or limited-series approach, allowing the producers of this international co-venture (among them Ridley and Tony Scott's shingle) to invest the story with appropriate literary heft.

Starz has other similar projects in the pipeline, including a 10-part version of "Camelot." In that sense, the channel has chosen its maiden venture wisely, inasmuch as "Pillars" lays a solid foundation for what's to come.

merci à Darcilicious.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 19:51

from Cleveland.com
Go poking around "The Pillars of the Earth" and you'll notice the staggering array of building materials used to construct this sprawling six-part miniseries. You'll spot plenty of romance, deceit, suspense, swordplay, murder, mayhem, melodrama. And that's just in the first two hours.

But the word that best describes Starz's eight-hour production is "throwback." All right, I know this erratic adaptation of Ken Follett's doorstop of a historical novel is set in the 12th century. How thrown back can you get with a story about a battle for the English throne?

Yet the real throwback quality can be found in the ambitious cable project's somewhat quaint design. This is where "The Pillars of the Earth" recalls the glory days of the big-budget miniseries far more than the Middle Ages.

That TV era lasted from the late 1970s to the late '80s. It was a time when miniseries were based on best-selling novels (some, like "Eye of the Needle" and "The Key to Rebecca," by Ken Follett). They often were costume dramas set in previous centuries. They tended to be long on spectacle (and running time) and short on subtlety. And they featured international casts of veteran stars and promising newcomers.

Those are the pillars on which this lavish structure stands. The production team led by Ridley and Tony Scott closely followed the traditional miniseries plans when building this imposing, if uneven, edifice.

The wily veteran players include Donald Sutherland and Ian McShane, and they both make the most of their screen time in "The Pillars of the Earth." While this is hardly a two-man Middle Ages road show, their presence adds badly needed doses of grit and authenticity to a script that's frequently as hackneyed as it is stilted.

Indeed, a likable and dedicated cast keeps the viewers engaged and in a forgiving mood throughout these choppy eight hours. They make for wonderful company, even when this long and winding 12th-century road gets more than a little bumpy.

The narrative style is . . . well, there really isn't one. The densely packed, briskly paced miniseries relentlessly drives forward, throwing scenes at you with little sense of style.

And the authenticity is . . . well, there isn't much of that, either. It's a pretty well-scrubbed, neatly coiffed vision of the 12th century, which probably is a good thing. A faithful depiction of a 12th-century village would suggest odors that would turn the stomach of a low-rent reality TV producer.

Follett's complex web of divided loyalties begins with the question of who is the rightful heir to King Henry's crown. The noble Bartholomew (Sutherland), the Earl of Shiring, supports Queen Maud (Alison Pill), Henry's only surviving legitimate daughter. The usurper is King Stephen (Tony Curran), Henry's nephew and the grandson of William the Conqueror.

The divide puts Bartholomew and his children, Aliena (Hayley Atwell) and Richard (Sam Claflin), on a collision course with the ruthless William Hamleigh (David Oakes) and his scheming mother, Regan (Sarah Parish).

The religious extremes of good and evil are represented by a kindly monk, Prior Philip (Matthew Macfadyen), and a plotting deacon, Waleran Bigod (McShane). Caught in the struggle are mason and master builder Tom Builder (Rufus Sewell) and his family.

Behind all the soap-opera elements and royal intrigue, there is the ongoing story of how a Gothic cathedral is constructed in Follett's fictional Kingsbridge. There's something wonderfully symbolic about that, from both a historical standpoint and a programming perspective. Here is this symbol of light, rising from the Middle Ages, overcoming great obstacles because of a master builder's determination and dedication.

And here's this visually stunning miniseries, overcoming great drawbacks with impressive production values and dedicated players. A triumph? Not quite, but, hey, that's the way they did it in those TV days of yore.

Merci à Darcilicious.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 19:54

Pillars of Earth shares sameness with other dramas. from here.
The Pillars of the Earthpossesses all the pillars of recent TV historical dramas.

This may prompt eye-rolling among historians, who won't see obvious connections between, say, ancient Rome and 16th-century England.

But in terms of TV shows?

A certain sameness is creeping into the historical dramas we've seen lately, despite the fact that centuries separate their time frames.

The latest entry isThe Pillars of the Earth, an eight-hour mini-series that debuts across Canada on Friday with a two-hour instalment on The Movie Network and Movie Central, as well as in the United States on the cable network Starz.

Technically speaking, the project -- which was shot in Hungary and Austria -- is a Canadian/German co-production.

Based on a 1989 book by Ken Follett,The Pillars of the Earthhas an impressive international cast that includes Ian McShane, Donald Sutherland, Rufus Sewell, Matthew Macfadyen, Alison Pill and Gordon Pinsent, among others.

But in the first two hours, at least, having that many cooks in the kitchen makes it tough to follow.

The Pillars of the Earthfocuses on the religious and political turmoil of 12th-century England, as a dark secret threatens to disrupt the succession to the throne. That wider plot is advanced and revealed through the construction of a magnificent new cathedral in Kingsbridge, after the old one mysteriously burns down.

There's good and evil, diplomacy and double-crossings, fighting and fornicating -- you know, all the usual crap.

On the positive side, McShane makes an outstanding villain. He plays Deacon Waleran Bigod, a ruthless manipulator who believes that gaining personal power within the Catholic Church is the best way to serve God.

McShane is so great at being evil, it's hard to believe it's the same actor who made us chuckle in the quirky British seriesLovejoy. Then again, McShane has far more darkness than light on his professional resume -- including his portrayal of Al Swearengen in Deadwood-- so the playfulness of Lovejoy is the exception rather than the rule.

It's the good-guy characters inThe Pillars of the Earth-- namely Prior Philip (Macfadyen) and Tom Builder (Sewell) -- who are somewhat bland.

Nonetheless, Tom does something early in the proceedings that makes it tough for us to accept him as someone for whom we should be rooting.

We have admired CBC'sThe Tudorsthrough the years, and if you're familiar with that series, The Pillars of the Earthis a splashier and flashier version.

Occasionally, the violence inThe Pillars of the Earthspills into the territory ofSpartacus: Blood and Sand,the gory Roman thriller that, not coincidentally, originates on Starz in the U.S.

Overall,The Pillars of the Earthisn't bad. But we admit to a sense of fatigue with the glut of TV period pieces detailing distant history (and there's another one on the way with The Borgias, set in the 15th century, that will air next year on CTV in Canada and Showtime in the U.S.).

Too much of anything dulls the senses. In that regard, what's past is not always a present.

bill.harris@sunmedia.ca

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 19:56

Television Blog
Ken Follett’s 1989 bestselling novel “The Pillars of the Earth” becomes an 8-hour miniseries on Starz beginning July 23.

“The Pillars of the Earth” is an epic story involving a secret disrupting the succession to the English crown.

At the start of the miniseries, King Henry’s daughter and nephew compete for the throne.

King Henry is played by Clive Wood (“Dr. Who”), while Alison Pill (“In Treatment”) is his daughter Maud and nephew Stephen is played by Tony Curran (“24″).

Due to church politics, Philip (Matthew Macfadyen, “Pride and Prejudice”), a monk, becomes indebted to Deacon Waleran (Ian McShane, “Deadwood”) after being elected the new prior of Kingsbridge.

Tom Builder (Rufus Sewell, “Eleventh Hour”) and his family are looking for work. Builder, a mason, ends up rebuilding Kingsbridge Cathedral for food and lodging. His wife has recently died, and a healer and her son have joined Tom’s family, but the healer is accused of being a witch.

Natalia Wörner (“Four Seasons”) plays Ellen the healer, and Eddie Redmayne (“Tess of the D’Urbervilles”) plays her son Jack.

Meanwhile, William, who aspires to become the Earl of Shiring, attacks Aliena and Richard, the daughter and son of Bartholomew, who is the Earl of Shiring and a strong supporter of Maud’s right to the throne.

David Oakes (“Trinity”) is William, while Donald Sutherland (“Dirty talentueux Money”) plays Bartholomew. His daughter and son are played by Hayley Atwell (“The Prisoner”) and Sam Claflin (“Any Human Heart”).

Bartholomew’s conspiracy against Stephen’s commandeering of the throne causes his downfall as well as his children’s.

And that’s just the beginning.

As you can tell, there’s a whole lot going on in this story.

If you are a huge fan of sagas, especially ones relating to royalty and religion, you’ll probably like this one.

I’m not such a devotee, however, and though it kept my interest up to a point, I wasn’t enthused by it.

Just overall a bit too overwhelming and I thought a scene involving accused witch Ellen was offensive (and I don’t usually have a weak stomach when it comes to what I view.)

Despite that, the majority of the acting is enjoyable, particularly Matthew Mcfadyen and Donald Sutherland, and it moves along at a steady pace as it concentrates on the various plot points.

If you’re a fan of the book, or this kind of tale, give it a try, otherwise you might not be able to stick with the entire miniseries.

– Melissa Hayer

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 18 Juil 2010 - 19:59

New York Post
Author Ken Follett, who has seen his bestsellers turned into films (“Eye of the Needle”) and television dramas, had one stipulation for anyone wanting to adapt his beloved 1989 novel “The Pillars of the Earth”: no stinginess when it came to air time.

“I’ve never made conditions with the other books, just sold the rights and left it to the filmmakers,” said the UK-born writer by phone recently. “But in this case, the story would be destroyed if it were reduced to four hours or two hours. That was a dealbreaker.”

A rollicking tale of passion, greed, and treachery among kings that’s set against the building of a cathedral in the fictional English town of Kingsbridge in the 12th century, the massive “Pillars,” which has sold more than 14 million copies, and was an Oprah’s Book Club selection, is now a Follett-approved, 8-hour miniseries on the pay cable channel Starz, premiering this Friday.

“I heaved a huge sigh of relief when I read it,” says Follett of John Pielmeier’s (“Agnes of God”) faithful, fast-paced script when it was sent to him a year and a half ago. “It really follows my story. It’s damn good.”

“Pillars” interweaves the tales of a mysterious female healer, an ambitious monk, a master builder, a feisty earl’s daughter, a power-mad churchman and countless others over decades of royal upheaval. Pielmeier describes the book’s enduring appeal this way:

“It’s a book about reaching upward,” says the 61-year-old playwright and screenwriter. A former actor, Pielmeier also plays the monk Cuthbert in the mini-series, Pielmeier adds, “Whether you’re a religious person striving to touch God, or a humanist trying to better yourself, the building of the cathedral is a really important metaphor for us. Plus, it’s just a great yarn, and so well told.”

Casting was a bonanza. Prestige stalwarts Donald Sutherland as compassionate earl Bartholomew, “Deadwood” star Ian McShane as the cunning Bishop Waleran, and PBS stud Matthew McFadyen (“Pride & Prejudice”) as Prior Philip, are joined by talented up-and-comers such as Hayley Atwell (“The Duchess”) as Bartholomew’s daughter Aliena, and Tony Award winner Eddie Redmayne (“Red”) as Jack, the young artist who falls for her.

Acclaimed actor Rufus Sewell (“Eleventh Hour”) also heads up the cast as hard-working mason Tom Builder, the cathedral’s initial planner. When he was sent the script, Sewell — who has played his fair share of noblemen and royalty in period pieces — fought hard to play Tom.

“It wasn’t their idea,” says Sewell, 42. “But I was interested in playing a straightforward, intelligent working man. There’s something poetic about his soul, his spiritual connection to his work. Of course, if they’d offered it to me, I probably would have campaigned to play something else! They were all really fleshed-out roles.”

The character in “Pillars” that readers loved to hate has always been William Hamleigh, a ruthless aspirant to earldom who commits many vile acts. British actor David Oakes says that playing the role has its own odd rewards.

“If you look at all the good guys in this film, they get to kiss girls and look handsome,” says Oakes, 26. “But I got to fight with swords, set fire to people and I got to do it wearing leather, looking medieval with gruesome facial hair. I’m hoping I get some hate mail.”

One letter writer could be Oakes’ own father, a clergyman who bought the novel upon learning of his son’s casting, only to have it fall open to a page describing one of William’s more awful sins.

“He said, ‘Congratulations, but I’m not particularly keen that you’re playing that character,’” recalls Oakes, laughing. “He’s been fantastic, but he doesn’t know a lot of what I shot, so he might disown me afterwards.”

At least Oakes has a fan in Follett, who was pleased with the casting, even when a character’s book description didn’t jibe with the hiree. “Regan Hamleigh [William’s scheming mother] is an extraordinarily hideous woman in the book, with a face covered with boils,” says Follett, 61. “And they cast Sarah Parish, who is beautiful! But the producers said, ‘Put a hideous person on-screen for too long, and people will switch off.’ So I understand that.”

In the end, Follett’s comfort with the handling of “Pillars,” which was filmed over five months last year in Hungary and Austria, was such that he allowed the same creative team to option its sequel, “World Without End.” Pielmeier is busy at work adapting that book right now.

Says Follett, “If everybody loves ‘The Pillars of the Earth’ as much as we think they’re going to, then we’ll make the second one.”

* Pillars of the earth

Friday, 10 p.m., Starz

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Jeu 22 Juil 2010 - 10:51



Dernière édition par Marina le Jeu 22 Juil 2010 - 18:44, édité 2 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Jeu 22 Juil 2010 - 10:56

Boston Herald
National Post

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Dernière édition par Marina le Mar 27 Juil 2010 - 5:56, édité 1 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Ven 23 Juil 2010 - 5:46

USAtoday

LosAngelesTimes

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Dim 25 Juil 2010 - 22:23

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Mar 27 Juil 2010 - 5:55

TVguide et ici

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Lun 2 Aoû 2010 - 5:13

Review of the third episode of TPOTE at IGN

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Lun 2 Aoû 2010 - 18:49

From the official website of The Pillars Of the Earth : What the critics say

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Mer 4 Aoû 2010 - 5:37

Paste Magazine.com: High Definition: The Pillars of the Earth Miniseries Review

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Dernière édition par Marina le Lun 23 Aoû 2010 - 19:13, édité 1 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Mer 4 Aoû 2010 - 16:04

Tandem communications

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Dernière édition par Marina le Lun 23 Aoû 2010 - 19:13, édité 1 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Jeu 5 Aoû 2010 - 15:19



Dernière édition par Marina le Lun 23 Aoû 2010 - 19:12, édité 1 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Ven 6 Aoû 2010 - 12:47

The Tyee

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Dernière édition par Marina le Lun 23 Aoû 2010 - 19:12, édité 1 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Marina le Lun 16 Aoû 2010 - 5:26

The Pillars of the Earth: "Legacy" Review (IGN, 15 août 2010).

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Matthieu le Lun 23 Aoû 2010 - 23:56

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Matthieu le Dim 29 Aoû 2010 - 20:15

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Matthieu le Dim 12 Sep 2010 - 3:42

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Re: La revue de presse

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