La revue de presse

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L'Express

Message  Luce le Lun 10 Sep 2012 - 10:29

En direct de Toronto, Keira Knightley, éblouissante Anna Karénine ( L'Express, le 7 septembre 2012) Very Happy
Cette fois-ci, il part à l'assaut d'un Everest: adapter Anna Karénine, le chef d'oeuvre de Tolstoï. Avec en filigrane, deux interrogations: comment s'emparer de ce sommet de la littérature russe sans répéter ce qui s'est déjà fait? Et pourquoi le porter à l'écran aujourd'hui?

Dès les premières images, ces interrogations volent en éclat. Wright adapte Anna Karénine aujourd'hui parce qu'il y voit une histoire intemporelle et universelle. Mais il s'y emploie avec une ambition formelle immense grâce à laquelle il entend traduire par l'image la fièvre de ce récit.
A l'écran, les changements de décors se font à vue d' oeil, le travail sur le son, tout à la fois délicat et puissant, les mouvements chorégraphiés. On pense à Baz Luhrmann dans ce désir de raconter une histoire avec force bruit et fureur. Joe Wright réussit à marier cinéma et théâtre à l'écran, exercice souvent tenté mais rarement réussi. En assumant leurs différences et, mieux, en les confrontant.
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The Irish Times

Message  Luce le Lun 10 Sep 2012 - 12:12

Anna Karenina (The Irish Times, 7 septembre 2012)4/5
Climb on board for a gorgeous, risky take on the classic Russian novel, writes DONALD CLARKE

IT IS, WE TRUST, not giving too much away to say that Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina has a great deal to do with trains. That vehicle offers us an irresistible metaphor for Joe Wright’s risky, gorgeous, unsentimental take on the most psychologically alert of 19th-century novels. If you chose to climb on board, you will be carried along at enjoyable pace. If you fail to make it into the carriage, you will feel furious, excluded and confused. In short, the picture is set to divide opinion.

Long before the English director rose to fame with Atonement and Pride Prejudice, he spent time honing skills at his parents’ puppet theatre in Islington. That experience seems to have inspired his decision to stage large parts of this project in an elaborate Victorian theatre. Characters open doors and find themselves gazing out into the auditorium. The foyer doubles as the entry hall to an array of elegant buildings. In one particularly expressionistic outbreak, an entire race meeting is staged in and around the proscenium.

For all the archness on display, this Anna Karenina feels as emotionally sincere as any previous adaptation. It helps that Wright has cast the film with such care and imagination. Keira Knightley, always at her best for this director, doesn’t have the greatest range – the two octaves run from fragile to neurotic – but, when safely within those confines, she is capable of eating the screen raw.

Knightley does very nicely as the Russian enigma, wife to a boring technocrat, who embarks on a ruinous affair with a glamorous but insubstantial army officer and brings social Armageddon crashing round her ears.

Knightley and director draw out the most capricious, most flinty aspects of Anna’s personality and, as a result, deliver a film that, though true to the book, may repel viewers expecting a three-hankie romance. No character gets a free ride from Tom Stoppard’s economic adaptation.

It says something about the odd progress of Jude Law’s career that, rather than appearing as Vronsky, the suave lover, he finds himself excelling as Anna’s flawed, oily, unattractive husband. One of the year’s key cinematic images will surely turn out to involve Alexei Karenin’s near-religious cradling of a rudimentary reusable prophylactic.

Aaron Taylor-Johnson is callow as Vronsky. Matthew Macfadyen’s is hilariously bluff as Anna’s brother. Purists may argue that Domhnall Gleeson is a little slight to play Levin (an unmistakable version of the young Tolstoy) but our busiest actor makes a touchingly fleshy naïf of the idealistic young landowner. Far from being a stray subplot, Levin’s adventures form the moral spine of Tolstoy’s panoramic story.

The scenes involving Levin also offer a few clues as to what Wright is up to with the theatrical staging. For the most part, Gleeson’s scenes are shot on location in relatively naturalistic style. He is attuned to nature and has little interest in the machinations of big-city society. By way of contrast, the courts, crush bars and salons of St Petersburg swarm with people who feel themselves constantly on display. The film’s visual conceit reminds us that these people were never really off the stage. Their lives were unbroken, formalised performances.

The convention also sets Wright free to experiment. At its very best, Anna Karenina comes across as a weird cousin of Michael Powell’s The Red Shoes. Seamus McGarvey, Oscar-nominated for Wright’s Atonement, allows gorgeously regal reds and crisp blues to seep across the lavish frame. A roof parts to reveal fireworks in the night sky. A ballroom sequence mutates into a freakish ballet.

For all this extravagance, however, Wright and Stoppard never allow focus to shift from the central romance. The film may not be the most moving version of the story, but it has more forward momentum than any previous adaptation.

None of which is to deny that many people will loathe it.
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Standing ovations at TIFF

Message  Marina le Lun 10 Sep 2012 - 18:52

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Lun 10 Sep 2012 - 21:57

On ‘Anna Karenina’, the film that far surpassed my expectations… (Blog : Stop traiding on my dreams, 10 septembre 2012)
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Mar 11 Sep 2012 - 18:06

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Mar 11 Sep 2012 - 20:03

TIFF Review: 'Anna Karenina' (Cinematographer, 9 septembre 2012)
Anna Karenina is a must-see film for anyone with a serious interest in the art of adaptation...

Oblonsky’s affair takes place mostly behind the scenes of the stage, with the public life of the characters playing out before the audience and the private indiscretions of the characters taking place within the wings. (The same goes for the matter of Levin’s ailing brother, who lies sick in a brothel.) There is also an audience in Anna Karenina. They’re always watching. Sometimes they have fans, and sometimes they have opera glasses, but they’re always watching, watching, watching. The audience frequently includes members of the principal cast, too, to emphasize the sense of suffocation that one feels in these highly scrutinized roles. ...

Anna Karenina is especially exhilarating because it offers a wholly unique rendering of the novel. (On the Road, please start taking notes.) Fidelity critics might suggest that Tolstoy is rolling in his grave since many of the eight-hundred-odd pages of his prose have been snipped in search of a film equivalent; however, instead of re-writing the novel and facing the painstaking task of condensing an epic work that is dense in both its narrative and thematic scopes, Stoppard’s adaptation of Anna Karenina plays more like an intellectual reading of the novel.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Mar 11 Sep 2012 - 20:12

TIFF Review: 'Anna Karenina' (Hitlist, 7 septembre 2012)
Directed by Joe Wright -- of "Atonement" and "Hanna" and "Pride and Prejudice" -- this "Anna Karenina" is less based on the famed Tolstoy novel of life in Russia, written in the 1870s, than it is inspired by it. Here at the Toronto International Film Festival, reactions ranged from sighing ecstasy to shrugging dissatisfaction; as for myself, I could see the point both had. At its best, Wright's film knocks the dust off of Tolstoy with evocative, visually splendid scenes and swooning, rapturous dance sequences; at its worst, it comes off as the worst of both Bertold Brecht and Baz Luhrmann. Set on a stage in a theater like some bizarre metafictional production that encompasses itself (we don't get to a real exterior shot for the first 30-40 minutes), Wright's approach will have some applauding how its anti-theatricality and staged staginess strip the mold and sediment of time and sentiment off Tolstoy's novel; others will find the invention and excess off-putting and irreverent. And thanks to director Wright, both may be right.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Mar 11 Sep 2012 - 20:21

Review: Anna Karenina (TIFF 2012) (JoBlo, 11 septembre 2012)
But- there's a wrinkle. While the first two-thirds of the film are imaginative, for some reason Wright slows the pace down to a crawl in the last section, and abandons a lot of techniques he used to tell the story, with scenes unfolding slower. As such, it started to feel conventional, which was a let-down.
However, even when it was conventional, the film still worked...

Supporting these three is a virtual who's who of British character actors, including Matthew Macfadyen as the cartoonish Oblonsky, and a frumped-up Kelly McDonald as his put-upon wife. However, the film is all but stolen by Domhnall Gleesonas the lovesick Levin (and possible Tolstoy surrogate). The son of Brendan Gleeson, this role firmly establishes him as a leading man to watch, and his affair with the initially impetuous Kitty (Alicia Vikander) is one of the best parts of the film.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Mer 12 Sep 2012 - 17:40

Anna Karenina (review) (FlickFilisopher, 12 septembre 2012)
It’s a startling sort of fakery, and, ironically, a uniquely cinematic one. When we watch an actual stage play, we see past the facade of the presentation, but here, the very fakery we unconsciously forgive on the boards is itself front and center on the screen -- it’s the whole point, and it’s not ignorable. There is no pretense that Wright is giving us a realistic depiction of late-19th-century Russia, and in the process, he isn’t merely creating a look that’s highly stylized, and he isn’t merely crafting a metaphor about the social structures under which we all live our lives, even today: he’s underscoring the artificiality of cinema itself. That will be uncomfortable to some -- indeed, there were a handful of walkouts at the screening I attended as soon as it became clear that this was not to be a standard costume drama. But “standard costume drama” is precisely what Anna Karenina does not need yet again

Film review: Anna Karenina (Getreading, 12 septembre 2012)
Wright’s beautiful, lyrical screen imagining of this tragic love story benefits from Knightley’s insouciance over how audiences receive her, since the character of Anna Karenina is not one which audiences readily identify with. She is a tragic figure, certainly, but one which we view from an emotional distance, which helps to universalise Tolstoy’s themes.

Criticised by some for pretension, and style over substance, what Wright actually does is draw out Tolstoy’s themes in the best way he can, using theatrical elements and stylised filming techniques to successfully convey meaning and characters’ feelings, and provoke an emotional response in the audience. Joe Wright’s Anna Karenina is just exquisite.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Mer 12 Sep 2012 - 21:36

Anna Karenina: The Rave (The artsdesk, 6 septembre 2012)

Spoiler:

Anna Karenina: The Rave
This adaptation has belligerent theatricality but is free of staginess
A curtain rises at the start of Joe Wright’s thrilling film version of Anna Karenina only for the finish several hours later to be accompanied in time-honoured fashion by the words “the end”. But for all the deliberate theatrical artifice of a movie about a society that knows a thing or two about putting itself on display, the delicious paradox of the occasion is this: in framing his Tolstoy adaptation as if it were a piece of theatre, Wright has made the least stagey film imaginable.

Staginess, in any case, has less to do with sets than a state of mind, and there’s no doubt from the off that Wright, his screenwriter Tom Stoppard, and a (mostly) first-rate cast are on the same page when it comes to capturing anew the dynamism and sweep of their source material. In some ways, one is reminded here of what Stephen Daldry achieved in his groundbreaking stage revival of An Inspector Calls: a potentially fusty piece reclaimed for keeps by an approach whose gutsy, visceral feel coexisted with a belligerent theatricality.

For all the ingenuity of a visual landscape there’s nothing pretty or falsified about the human ache on view

And like Daldry, Wright and Stoppard are fully at home across the two art forms, Wright having grown up within the milieu of the Little Angel puppet theatre in Islington before the cinema came to call. (The filmmaker, incidentally, has just announced his London stage directing debut, to take place next year at the Donmar.) If anything, the heightened emotions on view in this re-telling of Anna’s doomladen tale are amplified by our awareness of the constructed world around her: you gasp at the impossibly beautiful visuals not just as aesthetic glories in themselves but at the degree to which they seem cruelly to mock the enduring mess that these characters make of love.

At one point, the fluttering of Anna’s fan gives way to the sound of thundering hooves, just as a torn letter is seen morphing into snow: such aural and visual elisions are rife. But for all the ingenuity of a visual landscape befitting a populace used to comparably high-definition lives, there’s nothing pretty or falsified about the human ache on view.

At times, the conceit tilts toward the merely glossy: a post-coital shot of Keira Knightley’s Anna intertwined with Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s Vronsky (both pictured above) suggests an ad for Toast bedlinen. And Taylor-Johnson throughout plays a callow character callowly, which mutes the shifting emotions of the piece. But for the most part Seamus McGarvey’s camera work and Sarah Greenwood’s production design – both Oscar contenders, for sure – bring ravishingly to life a world of self-styled opulence and the meltdown that occurs when one tumbles from the pedestal that money and status can buy: this freefall is brilliantly realised in a scene at the opera in which Anna’s gathering shame trumps anything that the Russian haut-monde might actually be watching on stage.

Nor, as is sometimes true of such ventures, do the actors come second to the concept. Knightley may not possess the burnished splendour that Helen McCrory brought to the title heroine some while back on TV, but she cuts a compelling figure of fatalism, a woman alive to the imminence of her own death.

Amid a cast that includes a movingly indrawn Domhnall Gleeson, plumped-up Matthew Macfadyen, and magnificently snappish Olivia Williams, Jude Law (pictured above) gives the standout performance as Karenin, knuckles cracking as this cuckolded public figure tries not to give way to hate. Eyes hardening against a wife whom he watches in every sense slip from view, Law is the coolly commanding centre of a white-hot film. Is this were happening in a playhouse, the night’s largest ovation would be his.


Dernière édition par Luce le Ven 8 Nov 2013 - 9:37, édité 1 fois
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Jeu 13 Sep 2012 - 11:33

Film review: Anna Karenina (Seven Streets, 13 septembre 2012)
But Matthew Macfadyen’s (The Three Musketeers, Robin Hood) performance as Anna’s brother and fun loving philanderer Oblonsky is the highlight of the movie. Macfayden adds an energy to the film to match its visuals and definitely wins the battle of whiskers.

Since leaving the Harry Potter franchise behind, Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson (Shadow Dancer, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows) gives yet another compelling big screen performance as Levin, and Kelly Macdonald (Brave, No Country for Old Men) shows her versatility as Oblonsky’s wife Dolly.

The film’s unique set design is colourful, vibrant and at times spectacularly over-the-top but Anna Karenina is neither a stage play nor a straight period drama, and doesn’t quite work as either.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Jeu 13 Sep 2012 - 20:46

Review – Anna Karenina (Impact-The University of Nottingham's Official Student Magazine, 8 septembre 2012)
Where Anna Karenina loses a lot of its poignancy, though, is by weakening the connection between the stories of Levin and Anna, which are key in the novel and would have given Anna’s story much more perspective. In a sense, it is Kitty that plays the hinge of the two relationships from being spurned by Count Vronsky and then falling for the reliable charms of Levin (the character based on Tolstoy himself). From a technical point of view, the film is stunning, but with such creative vision there is a lot lost on the way; you are left feeling like you are a spectator, and the characters are so very far away.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Sam 15 Sep 2012 - 9:06

Anna Karenina (Cross Rythms, 15 septembre 2012)
Simon Dillon reviews the adaptation of the Leo Tolstoy novel.
First: a confession. I haven't read Anna Karenina. However, Joe Wright's recent adaptation of the Leo Tolstoy novel is something of a mixed bag as a piece of cinema. It has undeniable merits, but the more experimental aspects of the film ultimately come off as self-indulgent and pointless, undercutting much of the story's considerable emotional heft.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Matthieu le Lun 17 Sep 2012 - 21:30

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Mar 18 Sep 2012 - 19:02

Anna Karenina: A Brechtian Re-telling of the Russian Imaginary (Garageland Magazine, 17 septembre 2012)

Anna Karenina (2012) – Dir. Joe Wright (Megan Sense of Movies, 18 septembre 2012)
However, Joe Wright did it right. While some avid fans of the book will probably complain it would be a shame. The movie kept me on the edge of my seat the entire time. The action is sublime especially by the amazing Miss Knightley and surprisingly by Jude Law. He does not play great characters often, but when he chooses, he is incredible, and in this role, he is almost unrecognizable. A great supporting cast such as Kelly Macdonald, Olivia Williams and Matthew MacFadyen.

Matthew MacFadyen & Keira Knightley unlike their previous work together (Pride & Prejudice) play brother and sister, which frankly suits them best and Mr. MacFadyen shines in a character based role as opposed to a more dramatic and static one.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Mer 19 Sep 2012 - 19:28

Anna Karenina (Spooool, 11 septembre 2012)
The acting from all concerned is great. Matthew Macfadyen is superb as Oblonsky, bringing a lot of the humour to the film, almost like a pantomime dame he cuts through all the nonsense while being a terrible husband, and yet you can’t help but have affection for him. Levin is one of the great literary characters, a forerunner to Atticus Finch if you will, noble, honest and earnest in his pursuit of love. Domhnall Gleeson does an outstanding job in portraying the frustrations of Levin, showing how much he cares for the people in his life be they family, friend or employee. Stoppard has captured the essence of Levin from the novel and Gleeson more than adequately translates this from page to screen.


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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Jeu 20 Sep 2012 - 7:58

Movie Review - Anna Karenina (2012) (Flickering Myth, 11 septembre 2012)

Second Opinion - Anna Karenina (2012) (Flickering Myth, 20 septembre 2012)
The film is a triumph on nearly every level which is a comment I rarely bestow on modern films.

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Sam 22 Sep 2012 - 6:57

This ‘Anna Karenina’ has overlooked virtues. Not least that it is true to Tolstoy (The Independent, 21 septembre 2012)
His new film also does surprising things with emotional temperature, distancing the action through the device of shooting it as though in a theatre – now balletically, now as tableau, never letting us forget, as cinema so often wishes us to forget, that art is not the same as reality.
Critics, anyway, have in the main counted it a fault in Joe Wright’s Anna Karenina that the heroine doesn’t move them more. So how moving must moving be? The novel Tolstoy wrote is a far cry from the one he originally set out to write. In Anna, he created a flesh and blood woman, not an illustrated sermon against adultery. But the high-wrought felicity Anna risks everything for is not self-justifying by virtue of its intensity. Infidelity is not damned in this novel – only think of the vexatious charm of Anna’s faithless brother – but where the most urgent questions are asked about love and devotion, how trust is lost, where happiness is to be found, tears are not meant to drown judgement.

The idea of art fortifying our minds sits uneasily with us. We rightly dread losing the dramatic to the didactic. But we’re in trouble, as cinema-goers as we are as readers, once we start leaving our minds at home. What’s good about Joe Wright’s film is that, without any loss of magnanimity, or indeed feverishness, it takes us back to Tolstoy the thinker. To complain of distance is to make an unwarrantable assumption about the necessity of closeness. I don’t question the pleasure of engaging with fictional lovers as irresponsibly as they engage with one another; immersion in rapture is one of the joys of reading. But we honour those lovers more, as beings in a moral landscape, and as creatures of a serious artist’s imagination, if we feel their sorrows at our hearts while still managing to keep our wits about us.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Sam 22 Sep 2012 - 7:12

Doing justice to Anna Karenina (Spiked, 21 septembre 2012)
Wright flits between overblown stylised sequences and more naturalistic moments in real locales, forging a dynamic and fruitful juxtaposition. He is helped no end by the spectacular cast, with McFadyen at one end playing the buffoonish, womanising toff, and Jude Law at the other playing Anna’s ascetic but good-hearted husband...

Playwright and screenwriter Tom Stoppard, following hot on the heels of the success of his triumphant TV adaptation of Parade’s End, takes to reworking the novel with a light and rather sober touch. However, he still makes room for some of his trademark aphorisms. Oblonsky’s remark, ‘paperwork is the soul of Russia, farming is just the stomach’, is a firm favourite, yet he proves himself more than able to tackle the novel’s more heightened and poignant scenes.

Undoubtedly, it is Anna Karenina’s stylistic flourishes which set it apart from the innumerable adaptations this literary classic has spawned...
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Sam 22 Sep 2012 - 13:36

“Banana Karenina” (a.k.a. Elif Batuman) weighs in on new Tolstoy film. (The Book Haven, Stanford University, 4 septembre 2012)

D' Elif Batuman :"The Possessed : Adventures with Russian Books and the People Who Read Them."
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Balls

Message  Matthieu le Dim 23 Sep 2012 - 13:29

Anna Karenina and the Celebration of Ambition in Film (WhatCulture.com, 23 septembre 2012).
In a movie world so taken with the cult of conformity, pictures with ambition – pictures with balls – deserve attention from everyone.
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Lun 24 Sep 2012 - 11:19

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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Matthieu le Mar 25 Sep 2012 - 5:45

Review: Anna Karenina (The Yorker, 25 septembre 201).
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Sam 29 Sep 2012 - 12:43

Anna Karenina. (The FilmLounge, 27 septembre 2012)
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Re: La revue de presse

Message  Luce le Dim 7 Oct 2012 - 9:51

Anna Karenina, film review. (Liverpool Student Newspaper, 6 octobre 2012)
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Re: La revue de presse

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